Memorial lectern carved 1929, Minnie Piesse, Holy Trinity Church, North Hobart


Close up Minnie Piesse lectern.

Close up Minnie Piesse lectern.

Minnie Piesse lectern.

Minnie Piesse lectern.

DB193

The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954), Monday 28 October 1929, page 3

HOLY TRINITY CHURCH MINNIE PIESSE MEMORIAL.

DEDICATION SERVICE.

At Holy Trinity Church last evening the rector (Canon D. B. Blackwood) dedicated a beautiful blackwood carved lectern in memory of the late Miss Minnie Piesse. There was a large congregation, including many old friends and relatives of Miss Piesse.

The lectern was designed by Mr. Louis R. Williams, an “old boy” of Holy Trinity, and executed with fine craftsmanship by Mr. Gordon Triffitt, the carving being done by Mrs. C. Payne. The general design is a fine pedestal on a cross of St. Andrew, culminating in ionic scrolls. The book rest is twofold and swings round, the whole upper portion being decorated with carved lilies.

The senior churchwarden (Mr. H. L. D’Emden) unveiled the lectern and read the first lesson, Mr. J. E. Atkins also assisting in the service. The choir rendered nicely “What Are These” (Stainer) as an anthem, and Miss C. H. Burridge sang with feeling “My Task” as a solo.

The rector, in his sermon, referred to the wonderful life of service given by the late Miss Minnie Piesse in the parish of Holy Trinity for over 40 years. Special mention was made of her work among the young. During these 40 years she had been teaching in the Sunday school, being head of the infant and junior departments in succession. Her work in the Girls’ Friendly Society had been most valuable, as she had sympathetic understanding of girlhood and its needs. She had indeed proved a true friend to many a girl. After speaking of her work as a voluntary parish visitor Canon Blackwood referred to her work for and interest in St. Margaret’s mission at Federal Street. She had conducted girls’ clubs there and helped in all the activities of the mission. Her organising ability was seen in every concerted effort in the parish, and her thoroughness in great attention to detail. Her motto, he said, were the words of the Preacher, “Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might.” They might well thank God for her life and ministry in our midst. God had indeed spoken to many through her. It was fitting her memorial should be a lectern to hold the Word of God contained in the sacred Scriptures. Behind all her work was the motive power of the love of Christ and His Church.