Presentation address created 1920 for Prince of Wales by the Tasmanian Cambrian Society


Presentation address for Prince of Wales.

Presentation address for Prince of Wales.

DB176

Advocate, Thursday 10 March 1921, page 1

EMBLEM OF THE LEEK

PRESENTATION TO PRINCE OF WALES

The address presented to the Prince of Wales by the Tasmanian Cambrian Society, which, according to cable messages from London, is a feature of the exhibition at the imperial Institute,

It took the form of an exceedingly realistic imitation of a large leek, the emblem of Wales.

The base of the leek was of white kid, while green leaves were remarkably well simulated by the use of suede of a deep green colour and suitable texture.

The address was beautifully illuminated, and surmounted by the Welsh coat-of-arms, cunningly fixed in the centre of the leek. The whole was enclosed in a blackwood casket lined with silk. The lid was ornamented by the Prince of Wales’ plumes and motto in relief.

The Mercury, Friday 4 March 1921, page 5

THE PRINCE OF WALES EXHIBITION OF SOUVENIRS.
A TASMANIAN ADDRESS ADMIRED. LONDON, March 2.

An exhibition of the souvenirs of the Prince of Wales is being held at the Imperial Institute, and is attracting much public attention. A huge map is being displayed indicating the Renown’s route, and this is surmounted by the Prince’s standard, which was flown on the Renown.

The chief feature of the exhibition is the amazing collection of addresses, from the simplest written ones to splendidly illuminated volumes. Some of the newspapers describe the Tasmanian Cambrian Society’s address as the most original, and also refer to the address from the West Australian “Ugly Men’s Society.”

The address presented to the Prince of Wales by the Tasmanian Cambrian Society consisted of an exceedingly realistic imitation of a large leek (the leek having for centuries been a Welsh emblem) The base of the leek was of white kid, whilst the green leaves were remarkably well simulated by the use of suede of a deep green colour and suitable texture. The imitation was so excellent that it was hard to recognise that it was an artificial production. The leek had the address, beautifully illuminated and surmounted by the Welsh coat of arms, cunningly fixed in the centre. The whole was enclosed in a handsome blackwood casket lined with silk, and the lid was surmounted by the Prince of Wales’s plume and motto, en relievo. The casket was designed by Mr. A. W. John. It was made by Mr. J. J. Cowles, of Harrington Street, the carving was done by Mrs. Payne, and The Mercury office supplied the letterpress.